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Martin Luther King Program

MLK Spring 2021 Events

January 27

6:00 p.m. PT

Literary Reading by Ryka Aoki 

Ryka Aoki is a transgender woman and Japanese-American poet, composer, teacher, and the author of several volumes of poetry. She has performed her work widely, and she was honored by the California State Senate for her “extraordinary commitment to the visibility and well-being of Transgender people.” Aoki is currently a professor of English at Santa Monica College. Hosted by the WSU Visiting Writers Series.

Watch the YouTube livestream.

January 28

6:30 p.m. PT

Canceled

How Racism Harms White American: A Lecture with John H. Bracey, Jr. (2013, 52 min)

 

February 3

6:00 p.m. (PT)

Sustaining the Joys of Black Boys and Young Men in a World Against “The Black”

by Dr. Amir Gilmore

What does it mean to be against The Black? The question serves as a reminder that Black people—in particular Black boys and young men struggle to exist as humans within a world where there is such a disdain with Blackness. In the wake of school surveillance, mass criminalization, and gratuitous state-sanctioned and anti-Black vigilante violence levied against Black boys and young men’s minds, bodies, and souls, I think about how precarious their joy is and its importance to their future. When so many people struggle to love Blackness, how do Black boys and young men find ways to cultivate and sustain their mattering, well-being, futurity, and joy? Black Boy Joy is a spiritual Life Force and a liberatory emotional expression that satisfies Black boys and young men’s desires through the desired-based refusal of anti-Black terms, codes, rules, and laws that subjugate them. Within these disavowals, Black boys and young men create spaces of affirmation where they are felt, heard, seen, and matter. Thus, Black Boy Joy desires to dismantle a world where denigrating Blackness is appropriate and creates territories where Black boys and young men can flourish in their humanity, beauty, and brilliance—immediately.

Join the Zoom meeting with Dr. Amir Gilmore.

February 4

4:30 p.m. (PT)

DJ Lee on “How Not to Be the Hero of Your Own Story, the #1 Rule of Memoir Writing”

When you write a memoir, whether it be three-paragraphs or book-length, you are necessarily the hero of the story. But, as Susan Shapiro notes, qualities that make you likable and popular in real life like confidence, beauty, success, and intelligence can put off readers. By the same token, stories of abject victimhood can also make readers turn away. With reference to Trevor Noah’s Born a Crime and other successful memoirs, DJ Lee (English) will offer strategies for how to tell your story honestly while creating a genuine self your reader can relate to. Hosted by WSU Pullman Common Reading.

Join the Zoom meeting.

 

February 4

7:00 p.m. PT

MLK Trivia

Attendees at this Virtual Trivia Night will have their knowledge tested on the life and legacy of Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., as well as learn more about the civil rights icon in a relaxed atmosphere. Hosted by Global Connections as part of their MLK programming.

Register for MLK trivia.

February 9

4:00-5:30 p.m. (PT)

Panel Discussion on “Power of Voice”

This moderated panel will focus on experiences of alumni from WSU’s Murrow College who have been professionally involved in the Black Lives Matter movement. Panelists will include journalists and strategic communication practitioners whose work intersects with the BLM movement. The panel is intended to engage the community in discussions surrounding diversity, equity, inclusion, race, and social justice issues. Hosted by the Edward R. Murrow College of Communication.

Join the Zoom event.

February 9

6:00 p.m. PT

MLK Keynote: Dr. Anthony Jack

The Privileged Poor: How Colleges Are Failing Disadvantaged Students

Harvard scholar Anthony Jack researches the overlooked diversity among lower-income undergraduates: the Doubly Disadvantaged (those who enter college from local, typically distressed public schools) and the Privileged Poor (those who do so from boarding, day, and preparatory high schools). His research has earned numerous awards and the National Center for Institutional Diversity (University of Michigan) names him a 2016 Emerging Diversity Scholar.  His research has been featured in the New York Times, The Atlantic, The National Review, and NPR, and other media outletsLearn more about Dr. Anthony Jack and the MLK keynote speakers.

Co-hosted by WSU’s MLK and Common Reading Programs, along with the support of many units across the WSU system.

February 10

7:00 p.m. (PT)

YouTube Live: Chigozi Obioma Fiction Reading (Visiting Writers Series)

Chigozi Obioma is the author of The Fishermen, which was a finalist for the prestigious Man Booker prize in 2015, as well as a winner of several awards including an NAACP Image award and the FT/Oppenheimer prize for fiction. The novel, which is being translated into 26 languages, is being adapted into a stage play. Obioma was named one of Foreign Policy’s 100 Influential People of 2015. His second novel, An Orchestra of Minorities, was published in January 2019 to wide acclaim. It was also a finalist for the Book Man prize, making Obioma one of only two writers in history to be a finalist for all their published books. He is a professor of English and Creative Writing at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and in Nigeria, where he runs various projects. Hosted by the WSU Visiting Writers Series.

Watch the YouTube livestream.

February 16

6:30 p.m. PT

bell hooks: Cultural Criticism and Transformation (MLK Film Series) with panel discussion

bell hooks is one of America's most accessible public intellectuals. In this two-part video, extensively illustrated with many of the images under analysis, she makes a compelling argument for the transformative power of cultural criticism. In Part One, hooks discusses the theoretical foundations and positions that inform her work. In Part Two, she demonstrates the value of cultural studies in concrete analysis through such subjects as the OJ Simpson case, Madonna, Spike Lee, and gangsta rap. The aim of cultural analysis, she argues, should be the production of enlightened witnesses--audiences who engaged with the representations of cultural life knowledgeably and vigilantly.

Join the bell hooks film and panel discussion Zoom meeting. 

February 17

Noon (PT)

Peter Chilson interview with Malian Activist

This event is co-hosted with the Foley Institute. 

Watch the YouTube livestream.

February 17

7:00 p.m. PT

Game Night for All

In this virtual Game Night for All, students will have the opportunity to learn about Black History through a variety of short games. This event is part of Global Connections’ MLK programming.

Register for Game Night for All.

February 19

3:00-4:00 p.m. (PT)

Hip-Hop Artist Jasiri X

Based in Pittsburgh, Jasiri X is most known for his politically engaged lyrics and music videos discussion political candidates, urban poverty, and police violence. Jasiri uses Hip-Hop to reach young people and raise social awareness. Well-known withing activist circles, he has spoken and performed around the country, including at the 50th anniversary commemoration of the Selma to Montgomer March in spring 2015. He is a co-founder of the anti-violence group OneHood and started the 1Hood Media Academy to teach African American boys how to analyze and created media for themselves. Hosted by the Center for Intercultural Learning and Affirmation (WSU Vancouver).

Zoom Meeting Information:

Meeting ID: 925 5611 4958 – Passcode: 007222

February 23

Noon

Infusing DEI into Departmental Culture with Garry Morgan

Leveraging diversity, equity, and inclusion as a competitive advantage can result in greater innovation and success. Taking inventory of departmental culture and climate is a precursor to progress in any organization. This workshop is designed for professionals (faculty and staff) to investigate their individual departmental culture and learn promising practices that strive for true equity and inclusion.

Join the "Infusing DEI into Departmental Culture" Zoom meeting.

February 24

6:30 p.m. PT

Screening of Hip-Hop: Beyond Beats & Rhymes (2006, 60 min)

This film by Byron Hurt provides a riveting examination of manhood, sexism, and homophobia in hip-hop culture. Hurt—a former star college quarterback, longtime hip-hop fan, and gender violence education—conceived the documentary as a “loving critique” of a number of disturbing trends in the world of rap music. He pays tribute to hip-hop while challenging the rap music industry to take responsibility for glamorizing destructive, deeply conservative stereotypes of manhood. Hosted by the Office of Outreach and Education.

Join the "Hip-Hop: Beyond Beats & Rhymes" Zoom meeting.

March 1

7:00 p.m. (PT)

Poetry Reading by Major Jackson 

Major Jackson is the author of five books of poetry, including Leaving Saturn (2002) which won the Cave Canem Poetry Prize for a first book of poems. He has also served as the editor for Best American Poems 2019, Renga for Obama, and Library of America’s Countee Cullen: Collected Poems. A recipient of numerous fellowships and awards, Jackson’s poems have appeared in the New Yorker, The New York Times Book Review, the Paris Review, and multiple volumes of Best American Poetry, among others. He also serves as the Poetry Editor for The Harvard Review. Jackson lives in South Burlington, Vermont, where he is a Distinguished Professor of English at the University of Vermont. Hosted by the WSU Visiting Writers Series.

Watch the YouTube livestream.

March 3

12:00 p.m. PT

“I Have A Dream” Popcorn Reading

In this event, participants will have the opportunity to partake in a popcorn reading of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr’s landmark speech “I Have a Dream” with fellow Cougs through Zoom. This event is part of Global Connections’ MLK programming.

Register for the popcorn reading.

March 3

4:00 p.m. (PT)

Alex Tan (Communications) on “What Communication Science and Trevor Noah Can Tell Us about Racism”

Alex Tan (Communications) will present on the cultural origins of racism and how media, visual images, and language activate unconscious racism. He will also talk about the consequences of racism on evaluation and action as well as about interventions. Tan is the author of the newly released book Who is Racist?: Why Racism Matters (January 2021), a book that provides readers with tools and information to understand and combat racism. Hosted by WSU Pullman Common Reading.

Join via Zoom.

March 9

6:00-7:30 p.m. (PT)

Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Man with Panel Discussion, part 1

Emmanuel Acho launched this series in 2020 to fight one of the two viruses we faced in this devastating year: the virus of the mind, racism. With over 70 million views across 10 episodes, Acho has sat down to discuss race and racism with many people from the Petaluma Police Department to Chelsea Handler to Carl Lenz to Chip & Joanna Gaines. Participants will view Acho’s “uncomfortable conversation” with law enforcement from Petaluma Police Department about topics like defunding the police, Black Lives Matter, and accountability in the police force surrounding the tragic deaths of black civilians. Following the brief film, participants will discuss their thoughts and observations with the panel.

Join via Zoom.

March 11

Noon (PT)

Infusing DEI into Departmental Culture with Garry Morgan

Leveraging diversity, equity, and inclusion as a competitive advantage can result in greater innovation and success. Taking inventory of departmental culture and climate is a precursor to progress in any organization. This workshop is designed for professionals (faculty and staff) to investigate their individual departmental culture and learn promising practices that strive for true equity and inclusion.

Join the "Infusing DEI into Departmental Culture" Zoom meeting.

March 12

3:00-4:00 p.m. (PT)

Teresita “Lah Tere” Ayala

Afro-Puerto Rican Activist, Hip-Hop Artist, and Emcee

Ayala is a first-generation Afro-Antillean/Puerto Rican/Boricua activist who grew up in Chicago’s historic Puerto Rican community of Humbolt Part. Through her political and global activism, Lah Tere has worked to carve her own niche outside of the commercial hip-hop industry, focusing on building communities from within. Hosted by the Intercultural Learning and Affirmation (WSU Vancouver).

Zoom Meeting Information:

Meeting ID: 925 5611 4958 – Passcode: 007222

March 16

6:00 p.m. (PT)

Nonfiction Reading by Catina Bacote (Visiting Writers Series)

Catina Bacote is an African American nonfiction writer, specializing in creative nonfiction drawing on her personal story and social history. Her current research investigates the consequences of economic oppression and residential segregation, and her book project chronicles the lasting impact of the illegal drug trade on her family and community. Bacote is currently a faculty member in English at St. John’s University. Hosted by the WSU Visiting Writers Series. 

Watch the YouTube livestream.

March 16

7:00 p.m. PT

MLK Jeopardy Game

A Jeopardy-style game that will cover a wide range of topics and significant figures, including the life of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. Hosted by Global Connections as part of its MLK programming.

Register for MLK Jeopardy Game.

March 22

5:00 p.m. PT

Identity-Conscious Supervision with Dr. Shruti Desai and Robert Brown

Higher Education professionals often supervise in their careers but rarely receive training around supervision and management. Professional development focuses on skill-building in functional areas yet often ignores lived experiences of bias and hostility in the workplace that prevent learning and growth. These informational sessions for WSU professionals and/or students who supervise or hope to one day supervise, will advocate for an original approach by presenting nine core identity-conscious supervision practices, including traditional and innovative methods. Integrating these nine core practices into trainings for those that will supervise others will enable participants to develop an identity conscious supervision style that will increase retention and satisfaction within their various spheres of influence. 

Join via Zoom.

March 23

7:00 p.m. (PT)

C. S. Giscombe Poetry and Memoir Reading

C.S. Giscombe is author of many books of poetry and essays. His work has been published in Best American Poetry, Oxford Anthology of African-American Poetry, Norton Anthology of Postmodern American Poetry, Bluesprint: Black British Columbia Literature and Orature, and elsewhere. His current work in progress is a collaboration with the painter Judith Margolis and is an inquiry into the social spaces of white supremacy. The recipient of several fellowships and award, Giscombe is a professor at the University of California-Berkeley. Hosted by the WSU Visiting Writers Series.

Watch the YouTube livestream.

March 24

6:00-7:30 p.m. (PT)

Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Man with Panel Discussion, part 2

Emmanuel Acho launched this series in 2020 to fight one of the two viruses we faced in this devastating year: the virus of the mind, racism. With over 70 million views across 10 episodes, Acho has sat down to discuss race and racism with many people from the Petaluma Police Department to Chelsea Handler to Carl Lentz to Chip & Joanna Gaines. Participants will view Acho’s “uncomfortable conversation” with Carl Lentz, Pastor of Hillsong New York about race, religion, and the role religion plays in fueling and/or killing racism. Following the brief film, participants will discuss their thoughts and observations with the panel. 

Join via Zoom.

March 25

7:00-8:00 p.m. (PT)

Police Defunding Movement with Luis Fernandez (Sustainable Communities Program, Northern Arizona University)

WSU’s Roots of Contemporary Issues will be hosting Fernandez’s talk on the movement to defund police from a historical perspective. Fernandez is the author of Shutting Down the Streets: Political Violence and Social Control (forthcoming) and Policing Dissent: Social Control and the Anti-Globalization Movement (2008). Hosted by the Roots of Contemporary Issues and History Department.

March 29

6:00 p.m. PT

MLK Keynote: Ijeoma Oluo

Ijoema Oluo is a Seattle-based writer, speaker, and Intenet Yeller, who is the author of the New York Times Best-Seller So You want to Talk about Race (2018) and Mediocre: The Dangerous Legacy of White Male Power (2020). Oluo’s work focuses primarily on issues of race and identity, feminism, social and mental health, social justice, the arts, and the personal essay. Her writing has been featured in The Washington Poast, NBC News, Elle Magazine, TIME, The Stranger, and the Guardian, among other outlets. She was named one of The Roots 100 Most Influential African Americans in 2017 and was awarded the 2018 Feminist Humanist Award. Co-Hosted by the MLK and Common Reading programs as a keynote event, with sponsorship from many units across the WSU system.

Learn more about Ijeoma Oluo and the MLK keynote series. 

April 5

6:30-8:30 p.m. (PT)

White Like Me: Race, Racism, and White Privilege in America Featuring Tim Wise 

Based on the work of acclaimed anti-racist educator and author Tim Wise, this documentary explores race and racism in the US through the lens of whiteness and white privilege. In a stunning reassessment of the American ideal of meritocracy and claims that we've entered a post-racial society, Wise offers a fascinating look back at the race-based white entitlement programs that built the American middle class and argues that our failure as a society to come to terms with this legacy of white privilege continues to perpetuate racial inequality and race-driven political resentments today.

April 6

7:00 p.m. (PT)

Virtual Scattergories

The classic game of word categorization, with a virtual twist! Attendees will compete to come up with relevant words for a series of categorizations. Hosted by Global Connections as part of their MLK programming.

Register for Virtual Scattergories. 

April 7

6:00 p.m. (PT)

An Evening with Mahogany L. Browne

Mahogany Browne is a writer, organizer, an educator who serves as the Interim Executive Director of Urban Word NYC and Poetry Coordinator at St. Frances College. The author of several books, including Chlorine Sky (2021), Woke: A Young Poets Call to Justice (2020), and Black Girl Magic (2020), Browne is also the founder of Woke Baby Book Fair, a nationwide diversity literature campaign. She is completing her first book of essays on mass incarceration, investigating its impact on woman and children. Hosted by the WSU Visiting Writers Series.

Streamed on YouTube Live.

April 12

6:00 p.m. (PT)

Reading by Debra Magpie Earling

Debra Magpie Earling is a Native American novelist and short story writer, and Professor of English at the University of Montana. A member of the Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Reservation, she is the author of Perma Red (2002) and The Lost Journals of Sacajewea (2012). Hosted by the WSU Visiting Writers Series.

Watch the YouTube livestream.

April 15

Noon-1:00 p.m. (PT)

Erica England (Libraries) on The Impact of Systemic Racism on Library Collections

Hosted by the WSU Pullman Common Reading Program.

Join via Zoom.

April 30

3:00-4:00 p.m. (PT)

Robin Fifita (Tongan Visual Artist and Muralist)

Robin Fifita embraces and celebrates her unique cultural backgrounds: Tongan, Irish, and German. Her work is informed by the understanding and challenges that come from the convergence of contrasting elements, people, places, ideas, and expressions. Her work aims to explore the various points of intersection that cut across boundaries such as culture, class, language, space, and time. She currently works at Oregon State University’s School of Public Policy. Hosted by the Center for Intercultural Learning and Affirmation (WSU Vancouver).

Zoom Meeting Information:

Meeting ID: 925 5611 4958 – Passcode: 007222

Past MLK Spring 2021 Events

January 16

10:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. (PT)

SLO Food Drive

This year’s event will once again focus on sustainable, local, and organic options for food pantry patrons. All items collected will be donated to the Pullman Community Action Center and WSU Pullman Campus Pantry. Food can be dropped off at Grocery Outlet, Dissmore's IGA, and the Pullman Chamber of Commerce on January 16 or purchased onlineHosted by Center for Civic Engagement, Pullman Grocery Outlet, Dissmore's IGA, Pullman Chamber of Commerce, Moscow Food Co-op and WSU Eggert Family Organic Farm.

Learn more about the MLK food drive.

January 18

MLK Day of Service

This day of service was created in honor of Martin Luther King, Jr., a civil rights activist and American icon. Join us in celebrating this leader's life and accomplishments through service. Learn more about CCE-Led projects on the Palouse or find more opportunities to get involved in your area on GivePulseThis event is hosted by the Center for Civic Engagement.

View MLK service opportunities. 

January 21

6:00 p.m. PT

MLK Keynote: Bree Newsome Bass

An American filmmaker, musician, speaker, and activist from Charlotte, NC, Newsome Bass is best known for her act of civil disobedience on June 27, 2015, when she was arrested for removing the Confederate flat from the South Carolina state house grounds in the aftermath of the Charleston Shooting. Learn more about Bree Newsome Bass and the MLK keynote speaker series. 

Co-hosted by WSU’s MLK and Common Reading Programs, along with the support of many units across the WSU system.

Register for Bree Newsome Bass keynote. 

January 22

Noon-1:00 p.m. PT

Virtual Bingo with Student Groups

This Virtual Bingo event will be a space for Student Groups to chat with others regarding their mission and goals on topics of diversity and inclusion within the student body. Attendees will have the chance to ask questions and chat, all while playing some exciting rounds of virtual Bingo. Hosted by Global Connections as part of its MLK programming.

Register for Virtual Bingo with Student Groups.

January 22

3:00 p.m. PT

RAPtivist Aisha Fukushima

Aisha Fukushima is a performance lecturer, justice stragegist, singer/songwriter, and rap activits (RAPtivist). She is the founder of RAPtivism, a hip hop project spanning 20 countries and four continents that amplifies efforts for freedom and justice. A multilingual, multiracial African American Japanese woman, Fukushima has lectured and performed around the globe, highlighting links between such themes as hip hop, global citizenship, empowerment, feminism, and cultural activism through her storytelling and live musical performance. 

Part of the Cultural Arts and Equity Hip Hop Series (WSU Vancouver), this event is hosted by the Center for Intercultural Learning and Affirmation (WSU Vancouver), with co-sponsorship from the Common Reading Program (WSU Pullman), the MLK Program (WSU Pullman), and MOSAIC (WSU Tri Cities).

Zoom Meeting Info: 

Meeting ID: 925 5611 4958 – Passcode: 007222

January 25

5:00 p.m. PT

Identity-Conscious Supervision 

with Dr. Shruti Desai and Robert Brown

Student Affairs professionals often supervise in their careers but rarely receive training around supervision and management. Professional development focuses on skill-building in functional areas yet often ignores lived experiences of bias and hostility in the workplace that prevent learning and growth. This session advocates for an original approach by presenting nine core identity-conscious supervision practices, including traditional and innovative methods.

Join the "Identity-Conscious Supervision" Zoom meeting.

January 26

Noon-1:00 p.m. PT

Dr. Keneisha Grant (Howard University) on “The Great Migration and the Democratic Party

Keneshia Grant is and Associate Professor of Political Science at D.C.’s Howard University, where her research and teaching focus on state and local governments and Black voters. She is the author of The Great Migration and the Democratic Part: Black Voters and the Realignment of American Politics in the 20th Century (2020). Hosted by the Thomas S. Foley Institute for Public Policy and Public Service. 

Streamed on YouTube Live. 

January 26

4:00-5:30 p.m. (PT)

Robert Bauman, Robert Franklin, and Laura Arata on “Challenging Exclusion and Segregation in the Mid-Columbia Region”

This panel will explore the racial segregation and resistance to discrimination in the Mid-Columbia region. The panel coincides with the publication of Bauman and Franklin’s new book Echoes of Exclusion and Resistance: Voices from the Hanford Region, published by the WSU Press. Hosted by the WSU Tri Cities College of Arts and Sciences.

Register for "Challenging Exclusion and Segregation in the Mid-Columbia Region."